What is the minimum distance while working close to 11 KV or 440 V overhead lines?

What is the minimum distance while working close to 11 KV or 440 V overhead lines?

Clearance from Buildings to low, medium and high voltage lines

Voltage Description Distance
11 KV to 33 KV Line passes above or adjacent to any building or part of a building 3.7 Meter
Above 33 KV Line passes above or adjacent to any building or part of a building 3.7+(0.3 for every additional 33 KV )

What distance is safe for 11 kv power lines?

As per the Indian Electricity Act, buildings should maintain a horizontal distance of 1.2 metres from 11kV lines and 4 metres from 66kV lines.

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What is the phase voltage on a 400 volt 3 phase?

Line voltage in a wye system is always the phase voltage multiplied by the square-root of “3” (1.732) and reflects the vector sum of two individual phase voltages present in a three phase system. Thusly, if the line voltage is “400V”, then the phase voltage is 400V divided by the square-root of “3” (1.732), which is 230V.

What is the phase voltage on a 400V Wye?

“400V” on a 400V 3-Phase wye-connected power supply indicates its line voltage. Line voltage in a wye system is always the phase voltage multiplied by the square-root of “3” (1.732) and reflects the vector sum of two individual phase voltages present in a three phase system.

What was the minimum phase to phase clearance specified?

• In the same time frame, IEC was considering minimum phase-phase and phase-ground clearances, based on either lightning or switching impulse voltage, for inclusion in IEC Publication 76-3 [5]. At that time, IEC was experimenting with two methods, the first based on BIL and the second on BSL.

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How much phase clearance is needed for 1123 kV?

It is interesting to note that 154 and 311 inches of phase-phase clearance are necessary for 1123 and 1706 kV switching impulse, respectively. Note that the position of the axes has been reversed in this figure. Figure 2. Phase-Phase Clearances in IEC and IEEE Standards