Are Smith and Wesson revolvers reliable?

Are Smith and Wesson revolvers reliable?

Generally, Smith & Wesson revolvers are excellent.

Why don’t they make top break revolvers anymore?

A few people have mused at some point that top-break revolvers would actually make more sense as a defensive pistol than swing-out cylinders. They were also one of the most popular designs well into the 20th century but eventually were phased out. Why? Because they became obsolete, mostly due to changes in ammunition.

How reliable is Smith and Wesson?

Above all, the M&P 2.0 Compact is utterly reliable. In a long-running test, American Rifleman put 2,016 rounds of ammunition, primarily 124 grain Sig Sauer ball ammunition through the pistol without a single malfunction.

Does anyone make a top break revolver?

North American Arms made a break-top version of their 22-magnum rimfire mini revolver called “The Ranger”.

Is the.38 Smith and Wesson a groundbreaking cartridge?

You could say this old but once groundbreaking cartridge – .38 Smith & Wesson – is one that just refuses to die. As explained in the text, the .38 S&W was a groundbreaking cartridge. However, Allan says it ought to be a historical footnote.

Is the.38 s and W still in use?

As explained in the text, the .38 S&W was a groundbreaking cartridge. However, Allan says it ought to be a historical footnote. Interestingly, it is still being offered by major ammomakers: (from left) .38 S&W, .38 Colt New Police, .38/200 Super Police, .38 S&W Shotshell, .380 Revolver Mk IIz.

Is the colt.38’s and W still available?

However, Allan says it ought to be a historical footnote. Interestingly, it is still being offered by major ammomakers: (from left) .38 S&W, .38 Colt New Police, .38/200 Super Police, .38 S&W Shotshell, .380 Revolver Mk IIz. This isn’t the more famous .38 S&W Special but rather its stubby ancestor from 1877 that is still available today.

What are the specs for A.38’s and W?

Current SAAMI specs call for a maximum average pressure of 14,500 psi moving a 145-grain bullet to 680 fps from a 4.0-inch test barrel. One would think Smith & Wesson would have used the case dimensions of the 1877 version when it developed the .38 S&W Special.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFZb2cWyDyE