What is maskable interrupt?

What is maskable interrupt?

Maskable interrupt is a hardware Interrupt that can be disabled or ignored by the instructions of CPU. A non-maskable interrupt is a hardware interrupt that cannot be disabled or ignored by the instructions of CPU. When maskable interrupt occur, it can be handled after executing the current instruction.

What is meant by maskable interrupts in microprocessor?

Maskable Interrupts are those which can be disabled or ignored by the microprocessor. These interrupts are either edge-triggered or level-triggered, so they can be disabled. INTR, RST 7.5, RST 6.5, RST 5.5 are maskable interrupts in 8085 microprocessor.

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What does maskable mean?

Filters. (computing, usually of an interrupt) That can be masked (disabled). adjective.

What are maskable and non maskable interrupts in 8086?

The 8086 has two hardware interrupt pins, i.e. NMI and INTR. NMI is a non-maskable interrupt and INTR is a maskable interrupt having lower priority. One more interrupt pin associated is INTA called interrupt acknowledge.

What are the two types of interrupts in 8086?

What’s the difference between a maskable and a non maskable interrupt?

Maskable interrupt is a hardware Interrupt that can be disabled or ignored by the instructions of CPU. A non-maskable interrupt is a hardware interrupt that cannot be disabled or ignored by the instructions of CPU.

How long does it take to process a maskable interrupt?

In many situations, they take 13 clock cycles. A maskable interrupt is processed in several steps once the interrupt request is sent to the CPU. The interrupt flag register (IFR) corresponding to the interrupt is set. The interrupt enable register (IER) is checked to ensure that the interrupt is enabled.

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Which is the non maskable interrupt in osdev?

The NMI (“Non Maskable Interrupt”) is a hardware-driven interrupt much like the PIC interrupts, but the NMI goes either directly to the CPU, or via another controller (e.g., the ISP)—in which case you can mask them.

Why does a microprocessor have a non maskable interrupt mechanism?

Usually a microprocessor has an interrupt mechanism that is not maskable, that is, it cannot be disabled by the programmer. This non-maskable interrupt, NMI, has a higher priority than any of the maskable interrupt requests and is typically used to handle potentially catastrophic events such as the impending loss of power.