When did the Winchester Model 70 lightweight come out?

When did the Winchester Model 70 lightweight come out?

During early 1981, and the final days of Model 70 production by Olin, the lightweight rifle was reintroduced as the XTR Featherweight in .243, .257 Roberts, .270, 7x57mm Mauser, .30-06, and .308 Win. It had a push-feed bolt, and the ribbon-style checkering pattern on its stock had originated in the Winchester custom shop during the 1950s.

Is the buttplate of a Winchester 70 featherweight the same as a regular 70?

While the overall length of the original Featherweight stock was the same as the standard Model 70 stock, its fore-end was considerably trimmer, and the trimness extended back onto the action area of the stock. A couple of large holes drilled deep into the stock beneath the buttplate left another ounce or two of wood on the shop floor.

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Which is better a Winchester or a Remington?

The first blow came in 1949 when Remington introduced the Model 721/722 at $74.95; the Model 70 was priced at $109.50. The Winchester was a better rifle, but the difference in price was a big deal back then. The final blow came in 1962 when Remington improved the Model 722 and reintroduced it as the Model 700.

What was the price of a Remington Model 70 featherweight?

Like the Pre-’64 Featherweight’s bolt (top), the current-production bolt (bottom) has the non-rotating claw extractor and three-position safety. The first blow came in 1949 when Remington introduced the Model 721/722 at $74.95; the Model 70 was priced at $109.50.

Which is better the Winchester Model 70 or the Remington Magnum?

In some ways the Model 70 was still better, but due to a flashy new look along with the new 7mm Remington Magnum chambering, the Model 700 sold quite well at $115, which was mere pocket change more than it cost Winchester to manufacture the Model 70 at that time.

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What makes a Model 70 Winchester a bolt action rifle?

If there were a single feature responsible for the Model 70 being known as the “Bolt-Action Rifle of the Century,” it would be the classic Controlled Round Feed (CRF) bolt design. This is a massive claw extractor that smoothly slips onto and secures about one-quarter of the base of the cartridge.